Saying Good-bye to Texas

The month of May was a LONG month. We were only two months into the journey and already exhausted… physically, emotionally, psychologically and spiritually drained. But, we ended the month on a high note: one more overnight with strangers that would welcome us like family, and a meeting that both challenged us and encouraged us to continue on in the work the Lord was preparing.

I mentioned in the previous post how Jamie and I were wrestling through all the connections the Lord was making for us. The only commonality seemed to be the pendulum swing. We were connecting with people who were both ultra conservative and ultra progressive in their theology. I found both incredibly fascinating, probably those with the progressive bent a little more because it’s not my natural inclination. But more than that, the fascination they had with one another was even more intriguing.

When we went back to the Dallas, we stayed with a sweet family we had met during our previous trip. (Their son-in-law was the youth pastor of the church where Sydney and Brayden spoke.) The wife is one of the more knowledgeable women I personally know when it comes to the Bible. You can tell that she has studied the Word for most of her life and she has a naturally inquisitive mind, which showed itself when I told her that we had breakfast with the pastor of Austin New Church and his wife.

When I think about division in the church, specifically the American church, the issue of homosexuality, and gay marriage in particular, is front and center. There are other issues, like gender equality, racial equality and reconciliation, and a myriad of other “social justice” issues. But, gay marriage is a definitive line-in-the-sand issue and that line is causing a deep fissure which is fracturing denominations, and the church as a whole, as we speak.

This woman had so many questions about our meeting, about their theology, about their (mis)understanding of the Bible, about why we would WANT to meet with them. All fair questions. And, questions we have heard before. When you have a ministry/business that depends on the generosity of others, who you choose to “side with on theological issues” becomes important. And, honestly, it’s why most people don’t, unless, of course, you can actually increase your revenue from theological divides. (But that’s a COMPLETELY different conversation.) Regardless, I can say with 100% certainty, ESPECIALLY after this trip, it most definitely doesn’t apply to us.

But. I’ll confess, in that moment, there was this sense of uneasiness. It was becoming more clear that the Lord was calling us, not only to deep waters, but ROUGH waters. I hear people say that social media brings out the worst in people and they will say things on Facebook that they’d NEVER say in person. Well, that might be true for some people, but take my word for it. There are people out there who will say it to your face. It’s become a crazy world over the past few years. People will say things they wouldn’t have considered saying 10 years ago. (They were probably thinking it, but they NEVER would have thought about saying it out loud.) Those days are long gone I fear. Some people get easily offended and they will tell you so in an equally offensive way. (And trying to raise financial support from people is REALLY hard when you’ve offended them… even when the offense was unintentional.)

There was also another issue, we pretty much give away all of the money we bring in. That was by design. (Like I said, we don’t have a business model many would want to adopt.) Again, EVERYONE has advised us to stop giving money away and we get it. But, the Lord has made it clear this is what we’re suppose to do. While we could be out there fundraising for Be The Change, our kids feel strongly about advocating for others… and we support them. The Lord has continued to provide for our needs so why do we need more.

Isn’t that the model we see in Acts?

So essentially the two most important rules in running a business (don’t offend people and don’t give away your money) were becoming foundational components of the work the Lord was calling us to. (And just to be clear, we’re not intentionally offending people but we are asking them to take their views on certain issues and filter them through the gospel. That makes some people uncomfortable, especially when their views are shaped more by the world than by the work of Jesus.)

I won’t lie, we have questioned our methods more than once. They most assuredly don’t make sense from a worldly perspective. And here’s the CRAZY thing: Our biggest critics come from within the church… and some of the people most excited about our work aren’t even Christians.

Not yet anyway.

At the end of the day, all our second guessing was, for the most part, laid to rest after meeting with Dr. Ramesh Richard, founder of RREACH, a global proclamation ministry. The first thing we noticed off the bat was Dr. Richard’s attentiveness to our story. With pen and paper in hand, he continued to write notes as Sydney and I took turns sharing our story up to that point. But, more than that, it was his ability to understand Sydney’s vision that encouraged me more that anything.

Through the process of asking questions, Dr. Richard was helping Sydney pull together constant themes the Lord was underscoring in her life. And with the answers to these questions he was helping her articulate a vision for what the Lord might be calling her to. You can never see the forest through the trees if you’re constantly in the thick of it. Allowing her the space to pull back and see an aerial view of God’s work through her gave us both a deeper appreciation for where we were on the journey.

But he also said something that would forever solidify what we already felt confident in… our finances. When it specifically came to the idea of fundraising for others, Dr. Richard said, “In God’s economy, the well NEVER runs dry.” Essentially, if God is calling us to it, then He will provide for it.

We are literally six months out from this meeting and we can testify EVEN THIS PAST WEEK to this truth. Honestly, this whole trip is a testimony to it. And Dave Ramsey would cringe at how we manage our money. But, from our perspective, saving up for a future “rainy day” doesn’t really make sense when someone else is in the thick of their rainy day right now. And if we’re suppose to be trusting the Lord for our “daily bread” why are we building up our storehouses anyway?

It’s always there. The principles of the world, no matter how “sound” or “practical” they may be, often (if not always) find themselves in direct opposition to the way followers of Jesus are called to live their lives. I think a lot of us, my family included, have tried to play it both ways for a long time.

But what if we didn’t? What if we said no to the storehouses and rainy day funds? What if we just lived a simple life, taking only what we need and giving everything else to those in need? Is it even possible in today’s Christian culture?

It is. And while not completely impossible in today’s entertainment driven church culture, it is incredibly (and increasingly) more difficult. But, not impossible.

One Comment on “Saying Good-bye to Texas

  1. “But, from our perspective, saving up for a future “rainy day” doesn’t really make sense when someone else is in the thick of their rainy day right now. ” This is why I love you!

    Liked by 1 person

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